April 11, 2012

Elba and Napoleon: An Unlikely History

Leif Pettersen, Lonely Planet

The island of Elba, the largest in the Tuscan Archipelago, is a 260km drive and 15km ferry ride north of Rome. In July and August, the population density and traffic becomes so thick with vacationing Romans that one can push their car across the capital, Portoferraio, at about the same pace as driving it.

There’s good reason for this popularity. The modestly proportioned 28km long, 19km wide island offers copious rewarding trekking, cycling and camping opportunities in addition to abundant beaches and a substantial drool trail leading from one Slow Food-endorsed dinning establishment to another. A slightly more roomy and inexpensive shoulder season visit (April/May and September/October) is highly recommended.

 

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TAGGED: Italy, France, Napoleon Bonaparte

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