Look Inside House of Serial Killer

Serial killer Ed Gein may not garner the same immediate recognition as, say, Ted Bundy, but what authorities found in Ed Gein's house upon his capture was such a shock to 1950s America that his heinous acts would permanently impact true crime culture for decades to come.
For one, Gein had an unhealthy devotion to his dead mother — a characteristic that heavily influenced Robert Bloch's 1959 novel Psycho and the subsequent film adaptation.
The killer's penchant for decapitation, necrophilia, cutting off body parts, keeping victims' organs in jars, and creating homemade chairs, masks, and lampshades with their skin became an essential component of the visceral terror portrayed in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and The Silence of The Lambs.
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